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January at the Other Theatres

January at the Asakusa Public Hall

Daily: Jan 2 (Wed) - Jan 26 (Sat), 2019

Part 1:11:00 AM

Part 2: 3:00 PM

*No Part 1 on the 14th.
*Part 2 on the 20th will be 'Kabuki in Kimono', a performance where customers are recommended to wear kimono.
[Backside of the flyer]
◆Buy Tickets Online [For Non-Member/Multilingual Website]

On sale: from Nov 20 (Tue), 2018 10:00AM(JST)

First Class: 9,000 / Second Class: 6,000 /
Third Class: 3,000
Unit: Japanese Yen (tax included)

[Foreigner Discount tickets]
First Class: 7,000 / Second Class: 4,500
Unit: Japanese Yen (tax included)
*Sold only at the box office of the Asakusa Public Hall.
*Tickets are for the same day only.
*Only for foreign travelers to Japan. Customers will need to show their passports.
*Credit cards can be used at the Box Office.

Theatre Information

[New Year Asakusa Kabuki]
Celebrate the New Year in the midst of the festive bustle of Asakusa with a gala selection of plays and dances featuring the most talented young stars in kabuki today. Compared to other kabuki performances, the length of each show is shorter, the tickets are sold at very reasonable prices and there is also a cheerful event where you can watch kabuki in kimono. The program is perfect for tourists and customers who have never seen kabuki before.

MODORIKAGO IRO NI AIKATA

['The Returning Palanquin']

CAST :
Naniwa no Jirosaku, in reality, Ishikawa Goemon
Nakamura Kashō
Tayori, a child apprentice to a courtesan
Nakamura Umemaru
Azuma no Yoshirō, in reality, Mashiba Hisayoshi
Nakamura Tanenosuke
STORY :

This classic is a popular dance filled with many highlights and a charming old-world atmosphere.
Two palanquin bearers, Jirosaku and Yoshirō, return from the pleasure quarters carrying a 'kamuro', a child apprentice to a courtesan. They stop to rest and begin to boast to each other of their respective home towns in Osaka and Edo (present day Tokyo). Finally, however, the men retrieve objects concealed in each other's breast pocket, revealing their true identities. Only now do they realise that they are sworn enemies: a samurai and a notorious thief!

Genpei Nunobiki no Taki
YOSHIKATA SAIGO

['The Death of Yoshikata' from 'The Genji and the Heike at Nunobiki Falls']

CAST :
Kiso no Senjō Yoshikata
Onoe Matsuya
Orihei, Yoshikata's servant, in reality, Tada no Kurando Yukitsuna
Nakamura Hayato
Shinno Jirō Munemasa
Nakamura Hashinosuke
Lady Aoi, Yoshikata's wife
Nakamura Tsurumatsu
Princess Matsuyoi
Nakamura Umemaru
Yabase no Heinai
Nakamura Tanenosuke
Koman
Bandō Shingo
STORY :

This is one act from a history play which shows the early rise of the Genji clan after a time of oppression.
Yoshikata is the lone member of the Genji clan and pretends to have no interest in reviving its fortunes. However, Yoshikata is about to have a son who will eventually become the general, Yoshinaka, who will lead the Genji to victory. But, Yoshikata himself is attacked and surrounded, and he dies in a spectacular scene where he falls from the top of a flight of stairs.

IMOHORI CHŌJA

['The Success of a Potato-Digging Man']

CAST :
Tōgorō, the potato digger
Bandō Minosuke
Jirokurō, Tōgorō's friend
Nakamura Hashinosuke
Midori Gozen, the daughter of the Matsugae family widow
Bandō Shingo
Matsuba, a lady-in-waiting
Nakamura Tsurumatsu
Uhara Sanai
Nakamura Kashō
Sakigake Heima
Onoe Matsuya
STORY :

The widow of the Matsugae family who reigns over the district gives a dance party to choose a husband for her daughter Midori Gozen. They plan to choose the man who dances the best. Tōgorō the potato digger who is ardently in love with Midori Gozen attends the event. Unable to dance well, Tōgorō begins to describe the act of potato digging in his performance. The people have never seen such an interesting dance and praise him as the best in Japan.

KOTOBUKI SOGA NO TAIMEN

['The Revenge of the Soga Brothers']

CAST :
Soga no Gorō Tokimune
Onoe Matsuya
Soga no Jūrō Sukenari
Nakamura Kashō
Kobayashi Asahina
Bandō Minosuke
Ōiso no Tora
Bandō Shingo
Oniō Shinzaemon
Nakamura Hayato
Kewaizaka no Shōshō
Nakamura Umemaru
Kudō Saemon Suketsune
Nakamura Kinnosuke
STORY :

This scene is one act of a history play based on the legend of the Soga brothers' vendetta.
In the Edo period, plays about the vendetta carried out by the Soga brothers, Gorō and Jūrō, were performed every spring. 'Soga no Taimen', in which the brothers meet their nemesis, has its roots in the earliest of these plays. This play has ceremonial aspects and features each of the important kabuki character types, including the bombastic 'aragoto' style of Gorō and the soft 'wagoto' style of Jūrō.

BANCHŌ SARAYASHIKI

['The Dish Mansion at Banchō']

CAST :
Aoyama Harima
Nakamura Hayato
Okiku, lady-in-waiting
Nakamura Tanenosuke
Osen, lady-in-waiting
Nakamura Tsurumatsu
Hanaregoma Shirobē
Nakamura Hashinosuke
Mayumi, Harima's aunt
Nakamura Kinnosuke
STORY :

This is a new kabuki play, blending the ghost story of Okiku with a portrait of the interaction of different personalities. Aoyama Harima's aunt has arranged a marriage for him, but Harima is unable to admit that the reason he will not marry is because he is deeply in love with Okiku, a lady-in-waiting in his household. This makes Okiku wonder about the strength of Harima's love for her and she tests him by breaking one of a set of heirloom plates. When she tests Harima's feelings, this seals her fate and sets the tragedy of the play in motion.

NORIAIBUNE EHŌ MANZAI

['Manzai Entertainers on a Ferry Boat']

CAST :
Manzai
Bandō Minosuke
Saizō
Nakamura Tanenosuke
Sweet white saké seller
Bandō Shingo
Carpenter
Nakamura Hayato
Boatwoman
Nakamura Hashinosuke
Geisha
Nakamura Tsurumatsu
Baby-sitter
Nakamura Umemaru
Young master
Nakamura Kashō
Man-about-town
Onoe Matsuya
STORY :

A dance depicting the manners of Edo townsfolk in the Tenpō era (1830-1844).
At New Years a group of merrymakers happen to meet on a ferry boat. They are compared to the Seven Gods of Good Fortune and include a pair of manzai entertainers, who would go from door to door performing auspicious songs and dances.